Simply Satisfaction: Cobots do everything (but what you want to do)

Simply Satisfaction: Cobots do everything (but what you want to do), critically questions what extent a human needs to be involved in a task, and what can be automated so it can be optimally satisfying for the user. As artificial intelligence and robotics becomes more ingrained in everyday life, rather than purely focus on efficiency as a form of output or a value system, and replacing humans who have a natural desire to create, we need to focus on designing humans into the role of automation. The devices of Simply Satisfaction explore this division of labor through futuristic home devices that collaboratively automate the functionality of their task. The ideal experience, is not that the task is fully automated, but instead it has varying levels, or parts, that are automated. Some explore the satisfaction of collaboration by building the device, some training the device, and others train you. These devices augment the user in tasks everyone understands and relates to, while focusing on how the devices make the job simply more satisfying.







Images of the gallery installation >>





These are the videos from the gallery installation showing the experiments with each device and a little bit about them.



Gleb collaborating with the Laundry Folding cobot: Laundry Folding cobot trains Gleb on the best way to place his clothing on the device so it can fold it to his folding preferences. 








Gleb collaborating with Laundry De-Sorter cobot to launch and spread his clean laundery by density, so its more satisfying for him to fold things. Sometimes you want to automate a specific part of the process... just becuase you find it satasifying.




Barb mutually collaborating with Scissor cobot to cut paper. Scissor cobot reposistions the user by allowing them to experience the satisfaction of the cutting sensation, but making it so they have to work with the device to carry the task out.



Sarah collaborating with Laundry Roller cobot. Laundry Roller cobot isnt really great at its task, but it has really quirky cobotalities (much like human personalities but for cobots) that make it satisfying to work with from time to time.



Mike (me!) training Laundry Soap Dispencing cobot on how to poor laundry detergent into the washer.
This is an early exploration of what collaborating with artificially intelligent automation through the laundry process would be like.




This is an experiment using role playing to better understand what collaborating would be like throughout the whole laundry experience. The experiment focuses on what it would be like for the human to be able to step in at any point of the process to do the part that they enjoy doing, while automating everything else.
//Here are some of the earlier sketches that lead to the final devices.

In this sketch I used a low-fi prototype to explore what the relationship between a person and a cobot would be like. Each person was given a set of rules. The person roleplaying as the cobot was only allowed to move so many ways. The person was instructed to help the cobot only when they felt they needed to step in. It some sketches the human was allowed to move the cobot, but even with that option they didn’t. 


In this sketch I started to question what if a devices was only a one time use cobot.